Paleo Friendly

Meats

Be adventurous with the various cuts and preparations of meat (even organ meat!) to identify your favorites, and remember: happy animals make happy meat! Opt for grass‐fed and wild meats whenever possible, and avoid processed meats.

Seafood

As land animals, sea animals serve as a healthy source of protein as well as a variety of micronutrients. Many fish offer a solid dose of omega‐3 fatty acids (to be consumed in moderation and balanced with omega‐6 fatty acids) and essential vitamins and nutrients. Be sure to purchase seafood that’s sustainably sourced and try to avoid fish heavily exposed to environmental toxins.

Ca√ish Tuna
Anchovy Scallops
Mahi Mahi Crawfish
Mackerel Whitefish
Prawns Abalone
Cod Trout
Bass Basa
Swai Octopus
Shad Crayfish
Pollock Bonito
Cu†lefish Bluefish
Sole Haddock
Char Milkfish
Marlin Squid
Flounder Perch
Lamprey Roughy
Shark Herring
Oysters Grouper
Mussels Sardines
Swordfish Shrimp
Halibut Clams
Salmon Walleye
Snapper Tilapia
Barracuda Sunfish
Crab Lobster

Vegetables

Leafy greens: kale, spinach, lettuce, arugula, Bell peppers
bok choy, beet greens, chard, mustard Hot peppers
greens, radicchio, turnip greens, purslane, Sweet peppers
watercress, collard greens, dandelion greens, Artichoke
cabbage Squash blossoms
Cruciferous vegetables: Brussels sprouts, Onions
broccoli, broccolini, cauliflower, kohlrabi, Celery
broccoli rabe, rutabaga, horseradish, radish, Garlic
daikon Fennel
Tubers and safe starches: carrots, sweet Leeks
potatoes, yams, parsnips, taro, cassava, Shallots
yucca Green onions
Squashes: butternut, acorn, zucchini, yellow Cucumbers
squash, pumpkin, Mexican gray squash, Beets
Kabocha squash, Delicata squash, spaghetti Bamboo shoots
squash Jicama
Asparagus Seaweed
Eggplant Cactus

Fruits

Consume one to three servings of fruit a day and limit high‐sugar fruits to special indulgences. It’s also more beneficial to consume fruits in their raw, unaltered form—but we love smoothies, too.

Berries: blueberries, blackberries, acai, Honeydew
raspberries, lingonberries, Marionberries, Mango
cranberries, strawberries, goji, elderberries, Lychee
currants, bilberries Grapes
Stone fruit: peaches, nectarines, apricots Tomatoes
Citrus: lemons, oranges, limes, grapefruits, Tomatillos
tangerines, pomelos Pineapple
Coconuts Cantaloupe
Apples Figs
Plantains Dragon fruit
Avocado Guava
Watermelon Bananas
Papaya Honeydew

Fats & Oils

With grains excluded from the Paleo diet, nuts and seeds are popular replacements in Paleo versions of bread, cereals, pies, cakes and other baked goods. They form the basis of many dairy‐free milks, flours and nut butters. They’re also incredibly popular and sustaining snacks and salad toppings. While nuts open up a range of previously non‐Paleo offerings, they’re

nevertheless high in calories and undesirable phytic acid. Consume them mindfully.

Olive oil Macadamia nut oil
Coconut oil Rendered animal fats
Flaxseed oil Lard
Walnut oil Tallow
Avocado oil Ghee

Nuts & Søds

With grains excluded from the Paleo diet, nuts and seeds are popular replacements in Paleo versions of bread, cereals, pies, cakes and other baked goods. They form the basis of many dairy‐free milks, flours and nut butters. They’re also incredibly popular and sustaining snacks and salad toppings. While nuts open up a range of previously non‐Paleo offerings, they’re

nevertheless high in calories and undesirable phytic acid. Consume them mindfully.

Macadamia nuts Pine nuts
Walnuts Flax seeds
Hazelnuts Pumpkin seeds
Almonds Sunflower seeds
Pecans Sesame seeds

Non-Paleo Friendly:

Dairy

Much of the world’s population cannot tolerate lactose, the sugar found in milk. Mass commercially‐produced milk comes from industrially farmed cows, undesirable from both a health and ethical standpoint

Milk Evaporated milk
Cheese Condensed milk
Ice cream Yogurt
Bu†er Frozen yogurt
Cream cheese

Grains

Grains simply don’t measure up nutritionally to meat, seafood, vegetables and fruit. While filling, they are less nutrient‐dense when compared to food in the latter categories. In fact, modern milling removes most of these nutrients.

Cereal grains Semolina
Corn Polenta
Wheat Grits
Pseudocereals: quinoa, amaranth, Oats
buckwheat Barley
Pasta Enriched flours

Legumes

While typically considered healthy foods (who’s ever been angry with a bag of lentils?), legumes have a major downside: phytic acid. According to the gang over at Paleo Leap, “Phytic acid binds to nutrients in the food, preventing you from absorbing them.” While phytic acid is present in a number of Paleo‐friendly foods (like nuts), these foods are generally consumed in smaller quantities. Legumes, however, constitute a staple in many diets around the world, leading to overexposure to phytic acid as well as a host of other antinutrients.

Lentils Green beans
Beans: black beans, pinto beans, red beans, String beans
kidney beans, white beans, garbanzo beans, Snap peas
black-eyed peas, lima beans, Adzuki beans, Soybeans and soy products
Mung beans, navy beans, fava beans Tofu
Peanuts Peas

Refined Sugars & Artificial Sweeteners

We have a penchant for finding an absurd amount of ways to sweeten our food, as evidenced by our sweetener‐laden grocery store aisles. Our many sweeteners also have many names, making it difficult to suss out the added sugars in foods. There are only a few Paleo‐friendly sweetening agents: fruit, raw honey, pure maple syrup, and coconut sugar, all of which are low on the glycemic index. Still, these should not be a diet staple.

Acesulfame K Cane sugar
Aspartame Beet sugar
Neotame Maltitol
Saccharin Mannitol
Sucralose High fructose corn syrup
Refined white sugar Isomalt
Refined brown sugar Treacle
Agave Cane juice
Molasses Xylitol
Turbinado sugar

Highly Processed Junk

We probably don’t have to tell you this, but a Snickers bar is just about the farthest you can get from Paleo‐friendly. Junk foods are antithetical to the Paleo diet premise—and the premise of any balanced and healthy diet. Keep consumption of these to a minimum—or better yet, try some of the many Paleo alternatives.

Fast foods Energy drinks
Processed candy bars Fruit juices
Gummy candy Donuts
Ice cream Pastries
Sodas Processed condiments
Diet sodas Processed salad dressings
Processed meats: Spam Cakes
Potato chips Pretzels
Cookies

A Typical Day of Eating

The Paleo diet approaches nutrition in a revolutionary way, pairing the best of ancient principles with modern research and convenience. You don’t have to forage like a caveman to reap the benefits of Paleo, like reduced inflammation, improved energy levels, better sleep quality, and clearer skin! Now with all that being said, we know that unless your a “Paleo Enthusiast” you’re probably still wondering what a typical day of eating looks like once you go Paleo.

Let’s break it down into meals of the day below…

The Paleo Restart Nutrition Plan you will have you eating every 3 – 4 hours, ideally at 7am, 10am, 1pm, 4pm, and 7pm. This will prevent you from getting any hunger cravings, sugar cravings, bingeing, and will keep your metabolism firing – basically turning you into fat-burning machine! It will also keep you motivated and energetic for your workouts each day.

Breakfast

You will start off your day with a dose of protein. We recommend you start the day with a protein shake. If you’re the type of person who does not like to drink your food, then you will start the day with eggs in the form of an omelet or Frittata. Either way, you’re putting protein into your system first thing in the morning. It will help you stay fuller for longer. Don’t forget to add some healthy fats like avocado or some nuts and seeds for extra energy.

If you tend to skip breakfast you must break that habit now. To keep your metabolism firing, your body needs regular nutritious fuel, about every three hours.

AGer sleeping for around 6‐8 hours, you need to get your metabolism moving, and the only way to do that is to eat.

If you skip breakfast, you’ll start the day with a slower than normal metabolism. Your body senses that a famine is approaching, and it turns down your metabolic rate in order to conserve calories and fat. So get out of bed and give yourself enough time to prepare some breaky.

Mid M&ning Snack

To keep your metabolism on the go, you must feed it fuel about every 3‐4 hours. Make this snack high in protein, such as a can of tuna, egg salad or some bbq chicken. Eating protein will keep your metabolic rate up and prevent you from feeling the crash due to a reduction in carbs. If you’re on the go a piece of fruit is also fine.

Lunch

Lunch should consist of a lean source of protein, such as chicken breast or fish, along with your favorite vegetables such as steamed broccoli or asparagus OR you might even have a large salad full of greens & smashed avocado to accompany your protein. You might even include some sweet potato for some extra carbs as you head into the afternoon.

Mid Afternoon Snack

Dinner will be similar to lunch. Fist size protein source accompanied by a fresh salad or vegetables and served with some healthy fats.

Dinner

Dinner will be similar to lunch. Fist size protein source accompanied by a fresh salad or vegetables and served with some healthy fats.

Portion Control

What Should My Plate Look Like?

Portion control is understanding how much a serving size of food is and how many calories or how much food energy a serving contains. Yes we did just refer to portion control in the way of “counting calories” but don’t worry, the only numbers you’ll be counting are the Kg’s you’ll be dropping!

The failure to control portions is often caused by emotional factors such as a depressed mood, boredom or in a lot of cases a general lack of understanding as to how much food you should actually be consuming in order to lose weight. To avoid overeating triggered by emotions, planning meals ahead and using smaller dishes is definitely a must!

Portion sizes can be estimated by using objects as a point of reference. The quickest way to determine portion size is to compare hand size. For example, a healthy serving of protein should not be larger than a palm-size piece of meat.